The Safety Business



Get serious about your responsibilities for health and safety

Good management of health and safety isn’t just nice to have.  It should be woven into the fabric of your organisation. Why?  Well there are lots of reasons.

For a start, a written health and safety policy is a legal obligation in the UK if you employ more than five people. It’s not just petty bureaucracy.

Health and Safety Commission statistics prove that bad health and safety management practices cause workplace accidents. They can also cost money, time and effort, and loss of reputation.

If there is an accident in your workplace you could face fines and legal claims; not to mention increased insurance premiums.

They say all publicity is good publicity.  Not if you’re issued an enforcement notice by The Health and Safety Executive. Details of all HSE enforcement notices are available for all to see on the HSE Public Register of Notice History area of its website.  And they stay there for five years.

So you really do need to take your responsibilities for health and safety seriously.

 

Prevention is better than cure

out the doom and gloom here’s the good news.  Steering clear of enforcement notices, fines, lawsuits and downtime isn’t difficult. You can easily avoid risks to health and safety by accident prevention. You simply need sound health and safety systems that let you identify hazards and assess risks. Once you’ve done this you can introduce and maintain control measures.

And there’s more good news.  The Safety Business is here to help and advise you.

Call us on 0207 724 4038 or email us at info@thesafetybusiness.co.uk to find out how we can help you manage your responsibilities for health and safety.

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